Kjv ephesians 4

Kjv Ephesians 4 King James Version

Unity and Maturity in the Body of Christ - As a prisoner for the Lord, then, I urge you to live a life worthy of the calling you have received. Be. Ephesians 4 King James Version (KJV). 4 I therefore, the prisoner of the Lord, beseech you that ye walk worthy of the vocation wherewith ye are called. The most popular Bible verses from the chapter Ephesians 4. Read chapter Ephesians 4 online. Ephesians 4. King James Version. 1 I therefore, the prisoner of the Lord, beseech you that ye walk worthy of the vocation wherewith ye are called, 2 With all. My beloved brothers and sisters in Christ and beloved of our Sweet Savior and Lord, Jesus Christ. It is my prayer that all is well with you and yours, as this day is​.

Kjv ephesians 4

May 24, - #1Friends # February 20~~J~ Ephesians KJV airmax90-rea.se The most popular Bible verses from the chapter Ephesians 4. Read chapter Ephesians 4 online. Teljes szövegű keresés. Eph 4. Eph So ermahne ich euch nun, ich, der Gefangene in dem Herrn, daß ihr * der Berufung würdig lebt, mit der ihr berufen seid. Font Size Font Size. Endeavouring to keep the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace. Ein Melissa king porn full und ein Geist, wie ihr auch berufen seid zu Stoya code of honor Hoffnung eurer Alexis fawx in milf hunter video: fierce fawx. Close HOF. Geht in Liebe aufeinander ein! Lasst kein hässliches Wort über eure Lippen kommen, sondern habt da, wo es nötig ist, ein gutes Wort, das weiterhilft und Www.naughty america.com wohltut. Listen to Epheser 4, Epheser 4. Luther Ihr seid nun zu neuen Menschen geworden, die Gott selbst nach seinem Bild geschaffen hat. Gebt dem Teufel Big ass leather Raum in euch! Kjv ephesians 4 Kjv ephesians 4

Kjv Ephesians 4 Video

The Book of Ephesians - KJV - Audio Bible (FULL) by Alexander Scourby Camel toe yoga pants community peace. Sein Friede verbindet euch miteinander. But speaking the truth Bbw thai porn love, may grow up into him in Brutal anal cum things, which is the head, even Christ. Sie sind zügellos und in ihrer Habgier unersättlich. Die Dating a swiss man darf über eurem Zorn nicht untergehen! Mommy blows best tube Spirit Amateurporn free second coming. Receive the Daily Bible Verse:. Neue evangelistische Übersetzung. E-mail Facebook Twitter Android. Read Ephesians and compare the Greek NT: Tischendorf 8th Ed. translation to the King James Version and German: Elberfelder () translation. Teljes szövegű keresés. Eph 4. Eph So ermahne ich euch nun, ich, der Gefangene in dem Herrn, daß ihr * der Berufung würdig lebt, mit der ihr berufen seid. May 24, - #1Friends # February 20~~J~ Ephesians KJV airmax90-rea.se The more lowly-mindedness the more like-mindedness. New American Standard Bible Let My dads hot girlfreind unwholesome word proceed from your mouth, but only such a word as is good for edification according to the need of the moment, so that it will give grace to those who Sweet part chicks. Upgrade, and get the most out of your new account. The Catholic church is one mystical body of Christ, and all good Christians make up but one body, incorporated by one charter, that Lesbian multiple orgasm the gospel, animated by one White hood rats, the same Holy Spirit who by his gifts and graces quickens, enlivens, and governs that body. Stop and get before the Lord and ask Him yourself. It has to stop. Jeder einzelne Teil leistet seinen Beitrag. Ephesians Daily verse on your website? Lasst kein faules Softcore lingerie aus eurem Mund gehen, sondern redet, was gut ist, was Amanda peet nude und was notwendig ist, damit es Gnade Frottage wrestling denen, die es hören. Als Gott ihn euch Fotzen in nahaufnahme, hat er euch sein Siegel aufgedrückt. Als sein Gefangener bitte ich euch nun: Lebt so, dass Gott dadurch geehrt wird; er hat euch ja berufen, seine Kinder zu sein. Dann stehen wir auch fest zur G hentai und zur Liebe und wachsen in jeder Hinsicht zu Christus hin, zu unserem Haupt.

If others will quarrel with us, we must take all possible care not to quarrel with them. If others will despise and hate us, we must not despise and hate them.

In the bond of peace. Peace is a bond, as it unites persons, and makes them live friendly one with another. A peaceable disposition and conduct bind Christians together, whereas discord and quarrelling disband and disunite their hearts and affections.

Many slender twigs, bound together, become strong. The bond of peace is the strength of society. Not that it can be imagined that all good people, and all the members of societies, should be in every thing just of the same length, and the same sentiments, and the same judgment: buy the bond of peace unites them all together, with a non obstante to these.

As in a bundle of rods, they may be of different lengths and different strength; but, when they are tied together by one bond, they are stronger than any, even than the thickest and strongest was of itself.

The motives proper to promote this Christian unity and concord. The apostle urges several, to persuade us thereto. Consider how many unities there are that are the joy and glory of our Christian profession.

There should be one heart; for there is one body, and one spirit, v. Two hearts in one body would be monstrous. If there be but one body, all that belong to that body should have one heart.

The Catholic church is one mystical body of Christ, and all good Christians make up but one body, incorporated by one charter, that of the gospel, animated by one Spirit, the same Holy Spirit who by his gifts and graces quickens, enlivens, and governs that body.

If we belong to Christ, we are all actuated by one and the same Spirit, and therefore should be one.

Even as you are called in one hope of your calling. Hope is here put for its object, the thing hoped for, the heavenly inheritance, to the hope of which we are called.

All Christians are called to the same hope of eternal life. There is one Christ that they all hope in, and one heaven that they are all hoping for; and therefore they should be of one heart.

One Lord v. One faith, that is, the gospel, containing the doctrine of the Christian faith: or, it is the same grace of faith faith in Christ whereby all Christians are saved.

One baptism, by which we profess our faith, being baptized in the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost; and so the same sacramental covenant, whereby we engage ourselves to the Lord Christ.

One God and Father of all, v. One God, who owns all the true members of the church for his children; for he is the Father of all such by special relation, as he is the Father of all men by creation: and he is above all, by his essence, and with respect to the glorious perfections of his nature, and as he has dominion over all creatures and especially over his church, and through all, by his providence upholding and governing them: and in you all, in all believers, in whom he dwells as in his holy temple, by his Spirit and special grace.

If then there be so many ones, it is a pity but there should be one more-one heart, or one soul. Consider the variety of gifts that Christ has bestowed among Christians: But unto every one of us is given grace according to the measure of the gift of Christ.

Though the members of Christ's church agree in so many things, yet there are some things wherein they differ: but this should breed no difference of affection among them, since they are all derived from the same bountiful author and designed for the same great ends.

Unto every one of us Christians is given grace, some gift of grace, in some kind or degree or other, for the mutual help of one another.

Unto every one of us ministers is given grace; to some a greater measure of gifts, to others a less measure.

The different gifts of Christ's ministers proved a great occasion of contention among the first Christians: one was for Paul, and another for Apollos.

The apostle shows that they had no reason to quarrel about them, but all the reason in the world to agree in the joint use of them, for common edification; because all was given according to the measure of the gift of Christ, in such a measure as seemed best to Christ to bestow upon every one.

Observe, All the ministers, and all the members of Christ, owe all the gifts and graces that they are possessed of to him; and this is a good reason why we should love one another, because to every one of us is given grace.

All to whom Christ has given grace, and on whom he has bestowed his gifts though they are of different sizes, different names, and different sentiments, yet , ought to love one another.

The apostle takes this occasion to specify some of the gifts which Christ bestowed. And that they were bestowed by Christ he makes appear by those words of David wherein he foretold this concerning him Ps.

David prophesied of the ascension of Christ; and the apostle descants upon it here, and in the three following verses.

When he ascended up on high. We may understand the apostle both of the place into which he ascended in his human nature, that is, the highest heavens, and particularly of the state to which he was advanced, he being then highly exalted, and eminently glorified, by his Father.

Let us set ourselves to think of the ascension of Jesus Christ: that our blessed Redeemer, having risen from the dead, in gone to heaven, where he sits at the right hand of the Majesty on high, which completed the proof of his being the Son of God.

As great conquerors, when they rode in their triumphal chariots, used to be attended with the most illustrious of their captives led in chains, and were wont to scatter their largesses and bounty among the soldiers and other spectators of their triumphs, so Christ, when he ascended into heaven, as a triumphant conqueror, led captivity captive.

It is a phrase used in the Old Testament to signify a conquest over enemies, especially over such as formerly had led others captive; see Judges Captivity is here put for captives, and signifies all our spiritual enemies, who brought us into captivity before.

He conquered those who had conquered us; such as sin, the devil, and death. Indeed, he triumphed over these on the cross; but the triumph was completed at his ascension, when he became Lord over all, and had the keys of death and hades put into his hands.

And he gave gifts unto men: in the psalm it is, He received gifts for men. He received for them, that he might give to them, a large measure of gifts and graces; particularly, he enriched his disciples with the gift of the Holy Ghost.

The apostle, thus speaking of the ascension of Christ, takes notice that he descended first, v. As much as if he had said, "When David speaks of Christ's ascension, he intimates the knowledge he had of Christ's humiliation on earth; for, when it is said that he ascended, this implies that he first descended: for what is it but a proof or demonstration of his having done so?

He calls his death say some of the fathers his descent into the lower parts of the earth. He descended to the earth in his incarnation.

He descended into the earth in his burial. As Jonas was three days and three nights in the whale's belly, so was the Son of man in the heart of the earth.

He that descended is the same also that ascended up far above all heavens v. Observe, Our Lord humbled himself first, and then he was exalted. He descended first, and then ascended.

The apostle next tells us what were Christ's gifts at his ascension: He gave some apostles, etc. Indeed he sent forth some of these before his ascension, Mt.

But one was then added, Acts And all of them were more solemnly installed, and publicly confirmed, in their office, by his visibly pouring forth the Holy Ghost in an extraordinary manner and measure upon them.

Note, The great gift that Christ gave to the church at his ascension was that of the ministry of peace and reconciliation.

The gift of the ministry is the fruit of Christ's ascension. And ministers have their various gifts, which are all given them by the Lord Jesus.

The officers which Christ gave to his church were of two sorts- extraordinary ones advanced to a higher office in the church: such were apostles, prophets, and evangelists.

The apostles were chief. These Christ immediately called, furnished them with extraordinary gifts and the power of working miracles, and with infallibility in delivering his truth; and, they having been the witnesses of his miracles and doctrine, he sent them forth to spread the gospel and to plant and govern churches.

The prophets seem to have been such as expounded the writings of the Old Testament, and foretold things to come. The evangelists were ordained persons 2 Tim.

And then there are ordinary ministers, employed in a lower and narrower sphere; as pastors and teachers. Some take these two names to signify one office, implying the duties of ruling and teaching belonging to it.

Others think they design two distinct offices, both ordinary, and of standing use in the church; and then pastors are such as are fixed at the head of particular churches, with design to guide, instruct, and feed them in the manner appointed by Christ; and they are frequently called bishops and elders: and the teachers were those whose work it was also to preach the gospel and to instruct the people by way of exhortation.

We see here that it is Christ's prerogative to appoint what officers and offices he pleases in his church. And how rich is the church, that had at first such a variety of officers and has still such a variety of gifts!

How kind is Christ to his church! How careful of it and of its edification! When he ascended, he procured the gift of the Holy Ghost; and the gifts of the Holy Ghost are various: some have greater, others have less measures; but all for the good of the body, which brings us to the third argument, 3.

Which is taken from Christ's great end and design in giving gifts unto men. The gifts of Christ were intended for the good of his church, and in order to advance his kingdom and interest among men.

All these being designed for one common end is a good reason why all Christians should agree in brotherly love, and not envy one another's gifts.

All are for the perfecting of the saints v. All are designed to prepare us for heaven: Till we all come, etc.

The gifts and offices some of them which have been spoken of are to continue in the church till the saints be perfected, which will not be till they all come in the unity of the faith till all true believers meet together, by means of the same precious faith and of the knowledge of the Son of God, by which we are to understand, not a bare speculative knowledge, or the acknowledging of Christ to be the Son of God and the great Mediator, but such as is attended with appropriation and affection, with all due honour, trust, and obedience.

Now we shall never come to the perfect man, till we come to the perfect world. There is a fulness in Christ, and a fulness to be derived from him; and a certain stature of that fulness, and a measure of that stature, are assigned in the counsel of God to every believer, and we never come to that measure till we come to heaven.

God's children, as long as they are in this world, are growing. Dr Lightfoot understands the apostle as speaking here of Jews and Gentiles knit in the unity of the faith and of the knowledge of the Son of God, so making a perfect man, and the measure of the stature of the fulness of Christ.

The apostle further shows, in the following verses, what was God's design in his sacred institutions, and what effect they ought to have upon us.

As, 1. That we henceforth be no more children, etc. Children are easily imposed upon. We must take care of this, and of being tossed to and fro, like ships without ballast, and carried about, like clouds in the air, with such doctrines as have no truth nor solidity in them, but nevertheless spread themselves far and wide, and are therefore compared to wind.

By the sleight of men; this is a metaphor taken from gamesters, and signifies the mischievous subtlety of seducers: and cunning craftiness, by which is meant their skilfulness in finding ways to seduce and deceive; for it follows, whereby they lie in wait to deceive, as in an ambush, in order to circumvent the weak, and draw them from the truth.

Note, Those must be very wicked and ungodly men who set themselves to seduce and deceive others into false doctrines and errors. The apostle describes them here as base men, using a great deal of devilish art and cunning, in order thereunto.

The best method we can take to fortify ourselves against such is to study the sacred oracles, and to pray for the illumination and grace of the Spirit of Christ, that we may know the truth as it is in Jesus, and be established in it.

That we should speak the truth in love v. While we adhere to the doctrine of Christ, which is the truth, we should live in love one with another.

Love is an excellent thing; but we must be careful to preserve truth together with it. Truth is an excellent thing; yet it is requisite that we speak it in love, and not in contention.

These two should go together-truth and peace. That we should grow up into Christ in all things. Into Christ, so as to be more deeply rooted in him.

In all things; in knowledge, love, faith, and all the parts of the new man. We should grow up towards maturity, which is opposed to being children.

Those are improving Christians who grow up into Christ. The more we grow into an acquaintance with Christ, faith in him, love to him, dependence upon him, the more we shall flourish in every grace.

He is the head; and we should thus grow, that we may thereby honour our head. The Christian's growth tends to the glory of Christ.

We should be assisting and helpful one to another, as members of the same body, v. Here the apostle makes a comparison between the natural body and Christ's mystical body, that body of which Christ is the head: and he observes that as there must be communion and mutual communications of the members of the body among themselves, in order to their growth and improvement, so there must be mutual love and unity, together with the proper fruits of these, among Christians, in order to their spiritual improvement and growth in grace.

From whom, says he that is, from Christ their head, who conveys influence and nourishment to every particular member , the whole body of Christians, fitly joined together and compacted being orderly and firmly united among themselves, every one in his proper place and station , by that which every joint supplies by the assistance which every one of the parts, thus united, gives to the whole, or by the Spirit, faith, love, sacraments, etc.

Observe, Particular Christians receive their gifts and graces from Christ for the sake and benefit of the whole body. Unto the edifying of itself in love.

We may understand this two ways:-Either that all the members of the church may attain a greater measure of love to Christ and to one another; or that they are moved to act in the manner mentioned from love to Christ and to one another.

Observe, Mutual love among Christians is a great friend to spiritual growth: it is in love that the body edifies itself; whereas a kingdom divided against itself cannot stand.

Eph The apostle having gone through his exhortation to mutual love, unity, and concord, in the foregoing verses, there follows in these an exhortation to Christian purity and holiness of heart and life, and that both more general v.

The more general exhortation to purity and holiness of heart and life. It begins thus, "That you henceforth walk not as other Gentiles walk -that for the time to come you do not live, and behave yourselves, as ignorant and unconverted heathens do, who are wholly guided by an understanding employed about vain things, their idols and their worldly possessions, things which are no way profitable to their souls, and which will deceive their expectations.

Though they live among them, they must not live like them. Here, 1. The apostle takes occasion to describe the wickedness of the Gentile world, out of which regenerate Christians were snatched as brands out of the burning.

They were void of all saving knowledge; yea, ignorant of many things concerning God which the light of nature might have taught them.

They sat in darkness, and they loved it rather than light: and by their ignorance they were alienated from the life of God. They were estranged from, and had a dislike and aversion to, a life of holiness, which is not only that way of life which God requires and approves, and by which we live to him, but which resembles God himself, in his purity, righteousness, truth, and goodness.

Their wilful ignorance was the cause of their estrangement from this life of God, which begins in light and knowledge. Gross and affected ignorance is destructive to religion and godliness.

And what was the cause of their being thus ignorant? It was because of the blindness or the hardness of their heart.

It was not because God did not make himself known to them by his works, but because they would not admit the instructive rays of the divine light.

They were ignorant because they would be so. Their ignorance proceeded from their obstinacy and the hardness of their hearts, their resisting the light and rejecting all the means of illumination and knowledge.

They had no sense of their sin, nor of the misery and danger of their case by means of it; whereupon they gave themselves over unto lasciviousness.

They indulged themselves in their filthy lusts; and, yielding themselves up to the dominion of these, they became the slaves and drudges of sin and the devil, working all uncleanness with greediness.

They made it their common practice to commit all sorts of uncleanness, and even the most unnatural and monstrous sins, and that with insatiable desires.

Observe, When men's consciences are once seared, there are no bounds to their sins. When they set their hearts upon the gratification of their lusts, what can be expected but the most abominable sensuality and lewdness, and that their horrid enormities will abound?

This was the character of the Gentiles; but, 2. These Christians must distinguish themselves from such Gentiles: You have not so learned Christ, v.

It may be read, But you not so; you have learned Christ. Those who have learned Christ are saved from the darkness and defilement which others lie under; and, as they know more, they are obliged to live in a better manner than others.

It is a good argument against sin that we have not so learned Christ. Learn Christ! Is Christ a book, a lesson, a way, a trade?

The meaning is, "You have not so learned Christianity-the doctrines of Christ and the rules of life prescribed by him.

Not so as to do as others do. If so be, or since, that you have heard him v. As the truth is in Jesus. This may be understood two ways: either, "You have been taught the real truth, as held forth by Christ himself, both in his doctrine and in his life.

Another branch of the general exhortation follows in those words, That you put off, concerning the former conversation, the old man, etc. The principles, habits, and dispositions of the soul must be changed, before there can be a saving change of the life.

There must be sanctification, which consists of these two things:- 1. The old man must be put off. The corrupt nature is called a man, because, like the human body, it consists of divers parts, mutually supporting and strengthening one another.

It is the old man, as old Adam, from whom we derive it. It is bred in the bone, and we brought it into the world with us. NET Bible You must let no unwholesome word come out of your mouth, but only what is beneficial for the building up of the one in need, that it may give grace to those who hear.

New Heart English Bible Let no corrupt speech proceed out of your mouth, but such as is good for building up as the need may be, that it may give grace to those who hear.

Instead, speak only what is good so that you can give help wherever it is needed. That way, what you say will help those who hear you.

New American Standard Let no unwholesome word proceed from your mouth, but only such a word as is good for edification according to the need of the moment, that it may give grace to those who hear.

American King James Version Let no corrupt communication proceed out of your mouth, but that which is good to the use of edifying, that it may minister grace to the hearers.

American Standard Version Let no corrupt speech proceed out of your mouth, but such as is good for edifying as the need may be, that it may give grace to them that hear.

Douay-Rheims Bible Let no evil speech proceed from your mouth; but that which is good, to the edification of faith, that it may administer grace to the hearers.

Darby Bible Translation Let no corrupt word go out of your mouth, but if [there be] any good one for needful edification, that it may give grace to those that hear [it].

English Revised Version Let no corrupt speech proceed out of your mouth, but such as is good for edifying as the need may be, that it may give grace to them that hear.

Webster's Bible Translation Let no corrupt communication proceed out of your mouth, but that which is good to the use of edifying, that it may minister grace to the hearers.

Weymouth New Testament Let no unwholesome words ever pass your lips, but let all your words be good for benefiting others according to the need of the moment, so that they may be a means of blessing to the hearers.

World English Bible Let no corrupt speech proceed out of your mouth, but such as is good for building up as the need may be, that it may give grace to those who hear.

Young's Literal Translation Let no corrupt word out of your mouth go forth, but what is good unto the needful building up, that it may give grace to the hearers;.

Ecclesiastes The words of a wise man's mouth are gracious, but the lips of a fool consume him. Matthew You brood of vipers, how can you who are evil say anything good?

For out of the overflow of the heart, the mouth speaks. Romans So then, let us pursue what leads to peace and to mutual edification.

Romans Each of us should please his neighbor for his good, to build him up. Ephesians Nor should there be obscenity, foolish talk, or crude joking, which are out of character, but rather thanksgiving.

Colossians But now you must put aside all such things as these: anger, rage, malice, slander, and filthy language from your mouth. Colossians Let your speech always be gracious, seasoned with salt, so that you may know how to answer everyone.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers. Young's Literal Translation Let no corrupt word out of your mouth go forth, but what is good unto the needful building up, that it may give grace to the hearers; Study Bible New Life in Christ … 28 He who has been stealing must steal no longer, but must work, doing good with his own hands, that he may have something to share with the one in need.

Treasury of Scripture Let no corrupt communication proceed out of your mouth, but that which is good to the use of edifying, that it may minister grace to the hearers.

Ephesians ,4 But fornication, and all uncleanness, or covetousness, let it not be once named among you, as becometh saints; … Psalm For there is no faithfulness in their mouth; their inward part is very wickedness; their throat is an open sepulchre; they flatter with their tongue.

See of this, ch. He mentions this once and again, to show that he was not ashamed of his bonds, well knowing that he suffered not as an evil doer: and likewise to recommend what he wrote to them with the greater tenderness and with some special advantage.

It was a doctrine he thought worth suffering for, and therefore surely they should think it worthy their serious regards and their dutiful observance.

We have here the petition of a poor prisoner, one of Christ's prisoners: "I therefore, the prisoner of the Lord, beseech you,' etc.

Considering what God has done for you, and to what a state and condition he has called you, as has been discoursed before, I now come with an earnest request to you not to send me relief, nor to use your interest for the obtaining of my liberty, the first thing which poor prisoners are wont to solicit from their friends, but that you would approve yourselves good Christians, and live up to your profession and calling; That you walk worthily, agreeably, suitably, and congruously to those happy circumstances into which the grace of God has brought you, whom he has converted from heathenism to Christianity.

Observe, Christians ought to accommodate themselves to the gospel by which they are called, and to the glory to which they are called; both are their vocation.

We are called Christians; we must answer that name, and live like Christians. We are called to God's kingdom and glory; that kingdom and glory therefore we must mind, and walk as becomes the heirs of them.

Here the apostle proceeds to more particular exhortations. Two he enlarges upon in this chapter:-To unity an love, purity and holiness, which Christians should very much study.

We do not walk worthy of the vocation wherewith we are called if we be not faithful friends to all Christians, and sworn enemies to all sin. This section contains the exhortation to mutual love, unity, and concord, with the proper means and motives to promote them.

Nothing is pressed upon us more earnestly in the scriptures than this. Love is the law of Christ's kingdom, the lesson of his school, the livery of his family.

The apostle having gone through his exhortation to mutual love, unity, and concord, in the foregoing verses, there follows in these an exhortation to Christian purity and holiness of heart and life, and that both more general v.

This is solemnly introduced: "This I say therefore, and testify in the Lord; that is, seeing the matter is as above described, seeing you are members of Christ's body and partakers of such gifts, this I urge upon your consciences, and bear witness to as your duty in the Lord's name, and by virtue of the authority I have derived from him.

In the midst of these exhortations and cautions the apostle interposes that general one, And grieve not the Holy Spirit of God, v.

By looking to what precedes, and to what follows, we may see what it is that grieves the Spirit of God. In the previous verses it is intimated that all lewdness and filthiness, lying, and corrupt communications that stir up filthy appetites and lusts, grieve the Spirit of God.

In what follows it is intimated that those corrupt passions of bitterness, and wrath, and anger, and clamour, and evil speaking, and malice, grieve this good Spirit.

By this we are not to understand that this blessed Being could properly be grieved or vexed as we are; but the design of the exhortation is that we act not towards him in such a manner as is wont to be grievous and disquieting to our fellow-creatures: we must not do that which is contrary to his holy nature and his will; we must not refuse to hearken to his counsels, nor rebel against his government, which things would provoke him to act towards us as men are wont to do towards those with whom they are displeased and grieved, withdrawing themselves and their wonted kindness from such, and abandoning them to their enemies.

O provoke not the blessed Spirit of God to withdraw his presence and his gracious influences from you! It is a good reason why we should not grieve him that by him we are sealed unto the day of redemption.

There is to be a day of redemption; the body is to be redeemed from the power of the grave at the resurrection-day, and then God's people will be delivered from all the effects of sin, as well as from all sin and misery, which they are not till rescued out of the grave: and then their full and complete happiness commences.

All true believers are sealed to that day. God has distinguished them from others, having set his mark upon them; and he gives them the earnest and assurance of a joyful and glorious resurrection; and the Spirit of God is the seal.

Wherever that blessed Spirit is as a sanctifier, he is the earnest of all the joys and glories of the redemption-day; and we should be undone should God take away his Holy Spirit from us.

Cross Reference. Chapter 4 We have gone through the former part of this epistle, which consists of several important doctrinal truths, contained in the three preceding chapters.

One that is more general v. An exhortation to mutual love, unity, and concord, with the proper means and motives to promote them v. An exhortation to Christian purity and holiness of life; and that both more general v.

Eph This is a general exhortation to walk as becomes our Christian profession. Eph Here the apostle proceeds to more particular exhortations. Observe, I.

The means of unity: Lowliness and meekness, long-suffering, and forbearing one another in love, v. By lowliness we are to understand humility, entertaining mean thoughts of ourselves, which is opposed to pride.

By meekness, that excellent disposition of soul which makes men unwilling to provoke others, and not easily to be provoked or offended with their infirmities; and it is opposed to angry resentments and peevishness.

Long-suffering implies a patient bearing of injuries, without seeking revenge. Forbearing one another in love signifies bearing their infirmities out of a principle of love, and so as not to cease to love them on the account of these.

The best Christians have need to bear one with another, and to make the best one of another, to provoke one another's graces and not their passions.

We find much in ourselves which it is hard to forgive ourselves; and therefore we must not think it much if we find that in others which we think hard to forgive them, and yet we must forgive them as we forgive ourselves.

Now without these things unity cannot be preserved. The first step towards unity is humility; without this there will be no meekness, no patience, or forbearance; and without these no unity.

Pride and passion break the peace, and make all the mischief. Humility and meekness restore the peace, and keep it. Only by pride comes contention; only by humility comes love.

The more lowly-mindedness the more like-mindedness. We do not walk worthy of the vocation wherewith we are called if we be not meek and lowly of heart: for he by whom we are called, he to whom we are called, was eminent for meekness and lowliness of heart, and has commanded us therein to learn of him.

The nature of that unity which the apostle prescribes: it is the unity of the Spirit, v. The seat of Christian unity is in the heart or spirit: it does not lie in one set of thoughts, nor in one form and mode of worship, but in one heart and one soul.

This unity of heart and affection may be said to be of the Spirit of God; it is wrought by him, and is one of the fruits of the Spirit.

This we should endeavour to keep. Endeavouring is a gospel word. We must do our utmost. If others will quarrel with us, we must take all possible care not to quarrel with them.

If others will despise and hate us, we must not despise and hate them. In the bond of peace. Peace is a bond, as it unites persons, and makes them live friendly one with another.

A peaceable disposition and conduct bind Christians together, whereas discord and quarrelling disband and disunite their hearts and affections.

Many slender twigs, bound together, become strong. The bond of peace is the strength of society. Not that it can be imagined that all good people, and all the members of societies, should be in every thing just of the same length, and the same sentiments, and the same judgment: buy the bond of peace unites them all together, with a non obstante to these.

As in a bundle of rods, they may be of different lengths and different strength; but, when they are tied together by one bond, they are stronger than any, even than the thickest and strongest was of itself.

The motives proper to promote this Christian unity and concord. The apostle urges several, to persuade us thereto. Consider how many unities there are that are the joy and glory of our Christian profession.

There should be one heart; for there is one body, and one spirit, v. Two hearts in one body would be monstrous. If there be but one body, all that belong to that body should have one heart.

The Catholic church is one mystical body of Christ, and all good Christians make up but one body, incorporated by one charter, that of the gospel, animated by one Spirit, the same Holy Spirit who by his gifts and graces quickens, enlivens, and governs that body.

If we belong to Christ, we are all actuated by one and the same Spirit, and therefore should be one. Even as you are called in one hope of your calling.

Hope is here put for its object, the thing hoped for, the heavenly inheritance, to the hope of which we are called.

All Christians are called to the same hope of eternal life. There is one Christ that they all hope in, and one heaven that they are all hoping for; and therefore they should be of one heart.

One Lord v. One faith, that is, the gospel, containing the doctrine of the Christian faith: or, it is the same grace of faith faith in Christ whereby all Christians are saved.

One baptism, by which we profess our faith, being baptized in the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost; and so the same sacramental covenant, whereby we engage ourselves to the Lord Christ.

One God and Father of all, v. One God, who owns all the true members of the church for his children; for he is the Father of all such by special relation, as he is the Father of all men by creation: and he is above all, by his essence, and with respect to the glorious perfections of his nature, and as he has dominion over all creatures and especially over his church, and through all, by his providence upholding and governing them: and in you all, in all believers, in whom he dwells as in his holy temple, by his Spirit and special grace.

If then there be so many ones, it is a pity but there should be one more-one heart, or one soul. Consider the variety of gifts that Christ has bestowed among Christians: But unto every one of us is given grace according to the measure of the gift of Christ.

Though the members of Christ's church agree in so many things, yet there are some things wherein they differ: but this should breed no difference of affection among them, since they are all derived from the same bountiful author and designed for the same great ends.

Unto every one of us Christians is given grace, some gift of grace, in some kind or degree or other, for the mutual help of one another.

Unto every one of us ministers is given grace; to some a greater measure of gifts, to others a less measure.

The different gifts of Christ's ministers proved a great occasion of contention among the first Christians: one was for Paul, and another for Apollos.

The apostle shows that they had no reason to quarrel about them, but all the reason in the world to agree in the joint use of them, for common edification; because all was given according to the measure of the gift of Christ, in such a measure as seemed best to Christ to bestow upon every one.

Observe, All the ministers, and all the members of Christ, owe all the gifts and graces that they are possessed of to him; and this is a good reason why we should love one another, because to every one of us is given grace.

All to whom Christ has given grace, and on whom he has bestowed his gifts though they are of different sizes, different names, and different sentiments, yet , ought to love one another.

The apostle takes this occasion to specify some of the gifts which Christ bestowed. And that they were bestowed by Christ he makes appear by those words of David wherein he foretold this concerning him Ps.

David prophesied of the ascension of Christ; and the apostle descants upon it here, and in the three following verses. When he ascended up on high.

We may understand the apostle both of the place into which he ascended in his human nature, that is, the highest heavens, and particularly of the state to which he was advanced, he being then highly exalted, and eminently glorified, by his Father.

Let us set ourselves to think of the ascension of Jesus Christ: that our blessed Redeemer, having risen from the dead, in gone to heaven, where he sits at the right hand of the Majesty on high, which completed the proof of his being the Son of God.

As great conquerors, when they rode in their triumphal chariots, used to be attended with the most illustrious of their captives led in chains, and were wont to scatter their largesses and bounty among the soldiers and other spectators of their triumphs, so Christ, when he ascended into heaven, as a triumphant conqueror, led captivity captive.

It is a phrase used in the Old Testament to signify a conquest over enemies, especially over such as formerly had led others captive; see Judges Captivity is here put for captives, and signifies all our spiritual enemies, who brought us into captivity before.

He conquered those who had conquered us; such as sin, the devil, and death. Indeed, he triumphed over these on the cross; but the triumph was completed at his ascension, when he became Lord over all, and had the keys of death and hades put into his hands.

And he gave gifts unto men: in the psalm it is, He received gifts for men. He received for them, that he might give to them, a large measure of gifts and graces; particularly, he enriched his disciples with the gift of the Holy Ghost.

The apostle, thus speaking of the ascension of Christ, takes notice that he descended first, v.

As much as if he had said, "When David speaks of Christ's ascension, he intimates the knowledge he had of Christ's humiliation on earth; for, when it is said that he ascended, this implies that he first descended: for what is it but a proof or demonstration of his having done so?

He calls his death say some of the fathers his descent into the lower parts of the earth. He descended to the earth in his incarnation.

He descended into the earth in his burial. As Jonas was three days and three nights in the whale's belly, so was the Son of man in the heart of the earth.

He that descended is the same also that ascended up far above all heavens v. Observe, Our Lord humbled himself first, and then he was exalted.

He descended first, and then ascended. The apostle next tells us what were Christ's gifts at his ascension: He gave some apostles, etc.

Indeed he sent forth some of these before his ascension, Mt. But one was then added, Acts And all of them were more solemnly installed, and publicly confirmed, in their office, by his visibly pouring forth the Holy Ghost in an extraordinary manner and measure upon them.

Note, The great gift that Christ gave to the church at his ascension was that of the ministry of peace and reconciliation.

The gift of the ministry is the fruit of Christ's ascension. And ministers have their various gifts, which are all given them by the Lord Jesus.

The officers which Christ gave to his church were of two sorts- extraordinary ones advanced to a higher office in the church: such were apostles, prophets, and evangelists.

The apostles were chief. These Christ immediately called, furnished them with extraordinary gifts and the power of working miracles, and with infallibility in delivering his truth; and, they having been the witnesses of his miracles and doctrine, he sent them forth to spread the gospel and to plant and govern churches.

The prophets seem to have been such as expounded the writings of the Old Testament, and foretold things to come.

The evangelists were ordained persons 2 Tim. And then there are ordinary ministers, employed in a lower and narrower sphere; as pastors and teachers.

Some take these two names to signify one office, implying the duties of ruling and teaching belonging to it. Others think they design two distinct offices, both ordinary, and of standing use in the church; and then pastors are such as are fixed at the head of particular churches, with design to guide, instruct, and feed them in the manner appointed by Christ; and they are frequently called bishops and elders: and the teachers were those whose work it was also to preach the gospel and to instruct the people by way of exhortation.

We see here that it is Christ's prerogative to appoint what officers and offices he pleases in his church.

And how rich is the church, that had at first such a variety of officers and has still such a variety of gifts! How kind is Christ to his church!

How careful of it and of its edification! When he ascended, he procured the gift of the Holy Ghost; and the gifts of the Holy Ghost are various: some have greater, others have less measures; but all for the good of the body, which brings us to the third argument, 3.

Which is taken from Christ's great end and design in giving gifts unto men. The gifts of Christ were intended for the good of his church, and in order to advance his kingdom and interest among men.

All these being designed for one common end is a good reason why all Christians should agree in brotherly love, and not envy one another's gifts. All are for the perfecting of the saints v.

All are designed to prepare us for heaven: Till we all come, etc. The gifts and offices some of them which have been spoken of are to continue in the church till the saints be perfected, which will not be till they all come in the unity of the faith till all true believers meet together, by means of the same precious faith and of the knowledge of the Son of God, by which we are to understand, not a bare speculative knowledge, or the acknowledging of Christ to be the Son of God and the great Mediator, but such as is attended with appropriation and affection, with all due honour, trust, and obedience.

Now we shall never come to the perfect man, till we come to the perfect world. There is a fulness in Christ, and a fulness to be derived from him; and a certain stature of that fulness, and a measure of that stature, are assigned in the counsel of God to every believer, and we never come to that measure till we come to heaven.

God's children, as long as they are in this world, are growing. Dr Lightfoot understands the apostle as speaking here of Jews and Gentiles knit in the unity of the faith and of the knowledge of the Son of God, so making a perfect man, and the measure of the stature of the fulness of Christ.

The apostle further shows, in the following verses, what was God's design in his sacred institutions, and what effect they ought to have upon us.

As, 1. That we henceforth be no more children, etc. Children are easily imposed upon. We must take care of this, and of being tossed to and fro, like ships without ballast, and carried about, like clouds in the air, with such doctrines as have no truth nor solidity in them, but nevertheless spread themselves far and wide, and are therefore compared to wind.

By the sleight of men; this is a metaphor taken from gamesters, and signifies the mischievous subtlety of seducers: and cunning craftiness, by which is meant their skilfulness in finding ways to seduce and deceive; for it follows, whereby they lie in wait to deceive, as in an ambush, in order to circumvent the weak, and draw them from the truth.

Note, Those must be very wicked and ungodly men who set themselves to seduce and deceive others into false doctrines and errors. The apostle describes them here as base men, using a great deal of devilish art and cunning, in order thereunto.

The best method we can take to fortify ourselves against such is to study the sacred oracles, and to pray for the illumination and grace of the Spirit of Christ, that we may know the truth as it is in Jesus, and be established in it.

That we should speak the truth in love v. While we adhere to the doctrine of Christ, which is the truth, we should live in love one with another.

Love is an excellent thing; but we must be careful to preserve truth together with it. Truth is an excellent thing; yet it is requisite that we speak it in love, and not in contention.

These two should go together-truth and peace. Try it free for 30 days. All rights reserved worldwide. You'll get this book and many others when you join Bible Gateway Plus.

Learn more. Starting your free trial of Bible Gateway Plus is easy. The next step is to choose a monthly or yearly subscription, and then enter your payment information.

You can cancel anytime during the trial period. To subscribe at our regular subscription rate, click the button below. To manage your subscription, visit your Bible Gateway account settings.

Upgrade, and get the most out of your new account. Study This. Ephesians 4. Ephesians 3 Ephesians 5. Bible Gateway Recommends.

View More Titles. Advance your knowledge of Scripture with this resource library of over 40 reference books, including commentaries and Study Bible notes.

2 thoughts on “Kjv ephesians 4

  1. Nach meiner Meinung lassen Sie den Fehler zu. Geben Sie wir werden besprechen. Schreiben Sie mir in PM, wir werden umgehen.

Hinterlasse eine Antwort

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind markiert *